2020

OREGON EMS CONFERENCE

"The Year of the Virus" Virtual Conference

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THURSDAY

ALL HAZARDS DISASTER RESPONSE

Postponed to Saturday, 12 December 2020

**ATTENTION**  AN EMAIL WITH THIS INFORMATION WAS SENT TO ALL REGISTRANTS OF THIS COURSE AT THE EMAIL ADDRESS THEY REGISTERED WITH. Circumstances dictate that we postponed this class.  Our main instructor is serving on one of the wild-fires and then is being deployed for COVID in another part of the country.  We would like to move it to Saturday, December 12th.  Those already registered can either receive a refund, or we can credit them for the December date (an email has been sent to those registrants). Anyone who wants to register and participate on December 12th can do so. If the class reaches capacity, it is our intent to open another one. 


The All Hazards Disaster Response (AHDR) course teaches students how to respond to the many types of disaster scenarios they may encounter, including natural disasters and infrastructure failings, fires and radiological events, pandemics, active shooter incidents, and other mass casualty events. AHDR educates participants on how to analyze potential threats in their area, assess available resources, and create a response plan that will save lives. 

Features of a medical response plan covered in the course include:

  • Communicating effectively during disasters. 

  • Mutual aid and interoperability. 

  • Managing resources such as supplies, medications and equipment. 

  • Triage and transportation strategies and challenges. 

  • Patient tracking and evacuation. 

At the start of the course, participants conduct a “hazards vulnerability analysis” to assess features of their environment, both natural and man-made, that pose risk along with assessing the needs of vulnerable populations, such as assisted-living residents or hospital patients that need special consideration during such an event.

Content is presented in the context of realistic scenarios, culminating with a large-scale mass casualty activity. 

AHDR is appropriate for all levels of EMS practitioners. This course is offered in the classroom and provides 8 hours of CAPCE credit and NREMT recognition.

FlightBridgeED Friday/Saturday Conference Speakers

These sessions were moved into the Fri/Sat main conference. Due to various fire disaster and pandemic matters, several instructors could not remain committed on Thursday so those who are available are presenting Fri/Sat. Refer to the Conference Schedule.


Bruce Hoffman, MSN, CFRN, FP-C, CCP-C, NR-P, C-NPT
Chief Operating Officer
FlightBridgeED - "Your Partner in Discovery"

Bruce is a critical care registered nurse and paramedic whose clinical background includes the ICU, ER, trauma, cardiology and critical care transport/flight. He holds graduate degrees in education and advance practice and is the Chief Operating Officer at FlightBridgeED .

Topic 1: Chest Radiography: A Case-Based Approach | Saturday 0930-1030

HANDOUTS

Radiographic interpretation can take years to perfect; however, EMS and CCT rarely have the luxury or privilege of such training.  In this case-based presentation, Bruce reviews the essentials of chest radiography, necessary for the provision of safe and effective care to the critically ill or injured patient.  Each case scenario will highlight an essential component to the interpretation of the common CXR.

Topic 2: The OMI: A Look Beyond the Streets | Saturday 1300-1400

“The OMI: A Look Beyond the Streets" is a presentation, guided by case study, exploring the Occlusion Myocardial Infarction and the critical care which is continued after EMS hand off in the ED.  This enables the pre-hospital critical care provider to gain an additional glimpse into a world that goes beyond the streets of EMS.  This presentation is appropriate for both BLS and ALS providers.

Mike Verkest, AAS, CCP-C, FP-C, C-NPT, Paramedic

Vice President, Social Media and Marketing

Mike Verkest is a board-certified critical care and flight paramedic as well as the EMS Training for Clackamas Fire District #1 in the beautiful Willamette Valley near Portland, Oregon. In his 25th year of EMS, Mike has held a variety of positions within EMS. Since 2008, his primary focus has been in EMS Training.  Mike is currently the Chair of the Oregon Medical Board EMS Advisory committee. Mike also serves as the Vice President of Social Media and Marketing for FlightBridgeED, LLC. FlightBridgeED provides critical care review, advanced practice update courses, EMSPOCUS, and a variety of other EMS related courses and topics across the U.S. and internationally. He also hosts 2 popular EMS Podcasts “SecondShift” and “The EMS Lighthouse Project Podcast “   

Topic 1: Airway | Saturday 1100-1200

The Science of RSI - A procedural and literature-based discussion

This talk will cover the basics of medication-assisted intubation as well as look at the literature for the medications we use. Are all medications the same?

Topic 2: Trauma | Saturday 1430-1530

The Slippery slope of Permissive Hypotension

Sure, permissive hypotension has been a thing for quite a few years, but who is not good for? We will follow the same patient down 2 paths and see what happens when permissive hypotension goes bad.


FRIDAY

Kelly Grayson

Life, Death and Everything In Between

Blood. Broken glass. Twisted metal. Death. At some point in our careers, every EMT has asked himself the question, “Is this job really worth all this?” All too often, we discover that EMS does not love us nearly as much as we love it. The hours are long, the pay is low, and the pressures are enormous. So why do we continue to do it? Join Kelly Grayson as he describes a career arc from rookie EMT to experienced paramedic to career burnout and beyond. You’ll see yourself in these stories and laugh alongside him as we examine how we face Life, Death and Everything In Between.

Nancy Magee

Stop the Funk!  How clean is your ambulance?

Would you want your Grandma on this cot?”  Bacteria, viruses, mycobacteria and pathogenic fungus, bedbugs and body fluidsare unwanted, and often unseen passengers on the clothing and equipment of EMS providers and their patients. But compliance with everyday standard operating procedures for decontamination and disinfection, and concern for personal responsibility regarding safety and hygiene on shift can become lax when providers are overtaxed and undereducated on the dangers of cross contamination and its potential downstream consequences. In this session we will use black light technology to reveal some of the dirtiest places on “clean” trucks and talk about the role of EMS in eliminating the spread of everyday “funk” including MRSA, VRE, C-Diff and more.

Curtis Ryun

WHAT IS NEW AND WHAT HASN’T CHANGED.  A LOOK AT BURN PREVENTION AND TREATMENT - BLS

Curtis Ryun, Outreach Education Coordinator for the Oregon Burn Center will look at what you were taught in school for temperature control and what is in practice today.  A through review of the ABCDEs of burn care and how the “Rule of 9s” has changed while remaining the same.  And finally, he will review burn prevention programs and how those can be shared with your community. 

Matt Eschelbach

Time is Muscle- Do EMS Action Effect Patient Outcomes?

The adage time is muscle has been used to describe how every second of an acute coronary syndrome may lead to more dying heart muscle or myocardium.  What happens when we delay our diagnosis of a STEMI or a non-STEMI?  Can delays in proper EMS evaluation of chest pain lead to future problems in our patients?  What are some of the natural progressions of heart disease in our chest pain patients?  What are the most common complications of coronary artery disease (CAD)?  Come and learn why it is so important to correctly diagnose chest pain.  Learn some of the complications of the natural progression of CAD.  Discussed why time is muscle.


Jason Halsey

Trends in Fluid Resuscitation

This presentation will review common fluids used every day in the field and what other options exist for fluid resuscitation.  The use of blood and blood products will be discussed along with recent research and recommendations.

Curtis Ryun

Latest Research and Updates for Burn Management - ALS

Curtis will take the provider from the initial contact with a severely burned patient and the latest research in fluid resuscitation and what you as the first on scene can do by using the ABCDE of burn care treatment before definitive care is reached.   Inhalation injuries and when intubation is recommended.  Review of temperature control options and the criteria used for referral to the Oregon Burn Center will also be covered.  

Kelly Grayson

When Normal Is Not Normal: Children With Special Healthcare Needs

Quick, what’s the lower limit systolic pressure for an eighteen-month-old toddler? What’s the normal resting respiratory rate for that patient? How old will she get before she develops stranger and separation anxiety? What are normal cognitive and verbal skills for a patient her age?

If you knew the answer to all of those questions, wonderful. But can you answer them for an eighteen-month-old with hydrocephalus, cerebral palsy, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt and a tracheostomy?

Join us in this presentation as we learn to examine and treat a pediatric patient whose normal is nothing close to normal; the child with special healthcare needs.

Billie McNeely

Indicators of Elder Abuse-An Oregon Snapshot - Identify the signs and how and where

Learn the indicators of the types of elder abuse in Oregon and how to identify key signs.  Understand when suspected elder abuse should be reported, where to report and how to report. Review frequently asked questions surrounding mandatory cross-reporting as well as receive an overview of referrals and services provided through ADRC of Oregon.

Nancy Magee
Granny Fell Down and Gramps Can’t Poop: Understanding the Special Needs of Geriatric Patients.

Sick and injured elderly people is by far the largest cohort served by Emergency Medical Service providers of all levels. Their challenges can be simple, or very complicated, and quality pre- hospital care and patient advocacy can make a significant difference in both the continuum of care and their overall quality of life once the initial emergency has passed. In this session we will discuss common conditions associated with the aging process, and how men and women may present differently. We will consider hearing loss and dementia affecting communication, difficulty with mobility, medication complications.  and handling implanted medical devices such as LVADS, pacemakers, and indwelling catheters. End of life decisions, palliative care, interaction with hospice, DNRS, and the role of EMS advocacy for this vulnerable population will also be covered.


Kelly Grayson
Remember Three Things: Ten Medical Triads in Thirty Minutes

They’re scattered throughout medical training; simple tools to help us memorize vital diagnostic criteria. From the Trauma Triad of Death to the Monroe-Kellie Doctrine, join 

Kelly Grayson in this rapid-fire review of ten important medical triads in three minutes each. 

Jason Halsey

Common Pediatric Emergencies

SATURDAY

Ed Racht, MD

COVID19 – The not so subtle lessons learned that changed our lives

It was unexpected.  It was fast.  It turned on us.  And we were changing approaches more frequently than our underwear.  This once in a generation pandemic taught us some important lessons, reinforced and strengthened what we told each other we already knew and launched a whole new era in EMS practice and innovative EMS.

Jan Lee

“Nobody Raves About Average.”  The 15 Communication & Customer Service Skills EMS Providers Need.

The field of EMS naturally lends itself to the importance of customer service and great communication. The social treatment of patients, their families, bystanders, co-responders, sending and receiving staff and how we treat each other create our profession’s image and reputation. The highest level of technical competence is no substitute for professional conduct, courteous service and the “caring” part of patient care. Believe me…no one raves about average!  So to be forward-facing, in EMS, there are certain skills we all need that we help to ensure we’re delivering the right communication at the right time with emphasis on great customer service. Without these skills, we can find ourselves in embarrassing communication or customer service train wrecks. Lucky us…there are a few universal skills we can all master! 

Ed Racht

Yikes.  What’s that coming out of you?  Clinical clues in excretions and secretions…

I’ve told my kids this all their lives.  “Look at everything that comes out of you!”  Grossness and kidding aside, understanding the normal and abnormal fluids that the human body produces can provide valuable clues to underlying conditions.  You’ll never believe how informative the gunk in that tissue can be.

Bruce Hoffman

Chest Radiography: A Case-Based Approach

Radiographic interpretation can take years to perfect; however, EMS and CCT rarely have the luxury or privilege of such training.  In this case-based presentation, Bruce reviews the essentials of chest radiography, necessary for the provision of safe and effective care to the critically ill or injured patient.  Each case scenario will highlight an essential component to the interpretation of the common CXR.

The OMI: A Look Beyond the Streets

“The OMI: A Look Beyond the Streets" is a presentation, guided by case study, exploring the Occlusion Myocardial Infarction and the critical care which is continued after EMS hand off in the ED.  This enables the pre-hospital critical care provider to gain an additional glimpse into a world that goes beyond the streets of EMS.  This presentation is appropriate for both BLS and ALS providers.

Mike Verkest

Airway 

The Science of RSI - A procedural and literature-based discussion

This talk will cover the basics of medication-assisted intubation as well as look at the literature for the medications we use. Are all medications the same?

Trauma 

The Slippery slope of Permissive Hypotension

Sure, permissive hypotension has been a thing for quite a few years, but who is not good for? We will follow the same patient down 2 paths and see what happens when permissive hypotension goes bad.



Nancy Magee
YOU ATE WHAT?!
Tide Pods, the Cinnamon Dragon and other self- inflicted (and sometimes unintentional) poisoning calls.

In America, fads involving the ingestion of strange objects or substances are nothing new. In the 1930’s, swallowing goldfish was the hot trend for attention seeking high school students. But more recent challenges are becoming far more dangerous, and sometimes deadly. What’s going on out there? Who is participating? How do we treat these patients? In this session we will discuss what to expect if your patient has participated in the Tide Pod Challenge, The Cinnamon Dragon Challenge, Condom snorting, Butt Chugging alcohol, and other disturbing games where there are no winners.

Steve Pengra

Assessment and treatment considerations of Airway and Breathing Emergencies.    

This presentation will focus on identifying changes in your patient during emergency airway incidents you encounter.  Review how to utilize the available technology and tools; Pulse Oximetry, CPAP, and medications available to the BLS responder within your scope of practice. Tricks of the trade on sharping your assessment skill and improving patient outcomes. 

Steve Pengra

Toxicological Emergencies: Common hazards and treatment considerations when responding to a Toxicological Emergency (BLS)

Maintaining situational awareness and scene safety are the #1 concerns when responding to toxicological events.   This presentation will look at the assessment and treatment considerations of patients exposed to a variety of chemicals.  Understanding the resources of Oregon Poison Control and how to integrate EMS into the Decontamination process will be reviewed.



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